posted02/24/10

The Zero G Dog

No Comments
read more
posted02/19/10

Just a Couple of Cats Talking

No Comments
read more
posted02/17/10

The Ninja Cat

No Comments
read more
posted02/15/10

This Cat has Tamed the Roomba

No Comments
read more
posted02/11/10

Pet Weddings!

No Comments
read more
posted02/08/10

Dorito Superbowl Ad – Anti-Bark Collar

No Comments
read more
posted02/08/10

Banned Superbowl Ad – Bud Light Dog

No Comments
read more
posted02/05/10

Chameleon Commercial

No Comments
read more
posted02/05/10

Treating and Preventing Mange

Mange is a common skin condition that can cause significant distress to your dog or cat.  There are several forms of mange; each is caused by a specific type of mite.  In each case, the animal’s skin becomes irritated causing the dog or cat to itch the area excessively.  The problem will continue until it is diagnosed and treated properly.  Unfortunately, the mites that cause mange are so small that they can only be seen with the use of a microscope.  It is important to know the tell tale signs of mange as they are the only indication that a problem exists.

Sarcoptic Mange

We will first discuss a form of the condition known as sarcoptic mange.  Sarcoptic mange is a highly contagious form of mange, commonly referred to as scabies.  Caused by the Sarcoptes Scabiei Canis mite, sarcoptic mange can spread rapidly between infected animals.  Unfortunately, sarcoptic mange can even be spread to humans, causing the same severe itching and irritation. Fortunately, the mite is unable to reproduce on humans.  The symptoms of sarcoptic mange include hair loss, intense itching/scratching, and often times the tip of the ear will be crusted over. A veterinarian will take a sample with a scraping of the skin, but can often times diagnose the problem quickly based on the animal’s appearance.

When a dog has been diagnosed with sarcoptic mange, in most cases they will receive weekly injections of Ivermetcin for up to a month. Depending on their breed, not all dogs can be treated with Ivermetcin and may need to be dipped in an insecticide.  Ivermetcin and insecticide dips may treat the root of the problem, and ointments may be used to treat the sores on the skin.  Cortisone helps a lot to stop itching.  Additionally, every animal that has been exposed to sarcoptic mange must be treated, even if they don’t appear to be sick.  The life cycle of the mite lasts several weeks and an animal may be infected without showing any symptoms. The entire household or environment needs to be cleaned as well to prevent future infestations.

Demodectic Mange

The most common form of mange in dogs is demodectic, or Red Mange.  Affecting young animals, generally puppies, demodectic mange is caused by the Demodex canis mite.  Red mange is not contagious between dogs, puppies receive the mite from their mothers.  If a puppy is born without the condition, there is no possibility they will ever have it. Unlike sarcoptic mange, demodectic mange is not transferable to humans.

Demodectic mange can be diagnosed if the young dog has one or several hairless areas on their body.  Demodectic mange does not itch as much as sarcoptic mange but it is still a nuisance nonetheless.  In most cases, demodectic mange will clear up on its own.  Treatment may be sought to increase the rate of recovery.  Generally, an insecticide dip will be prescribed to help kill the mites.

Preventing Mange

While all types of mange are results of a mite infestation, they are also the result of malnutrition or a weakened immune system.  Most dog foods, regardless of price are cooked at high temperatures.  The result is that the omega fatty acids and nutrients that were once in the food are no longer active. The use of supplements, especially those containing omega fatty acids help to fortify the animal’s immune system and ward off mite infestations.  The IN® Diet Supplement has been around for over 20 years and has a longstanding history, backed by hundreds of testimonials for preventing and facilitating recovery from all types of mange.

No Comments
read more